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of people say the crosses represent the christian religion. the supreme court decision says this one in particular reflects the crosses of u.s. fallen soldiers you see in cemeteries where soldiers lost their lives in the name of freedom. it is not necessary about religion. thank you very much. >> this just in. a statement coming in now. associated press is reporting joe kelly. there are now two women involved in different ways in this scandal that surrounds general gave individual petraeus w -- d petraeus who left the cia on friday. jill kelly who received threatening e-mails from the computer of a former girlfriend paula broadwell with whom petraeus was having an affair allegedly. jill kelly issued a statement to the associated press acknowledging her friendship with the former cia director and asking now for privacy. as we have been reporting tonight the family says she p and petraeus had an affair but she received threatening e-mails from broadwell or from broadwell's computer. she contacted them. more than five years they have. >> to the right is the general's wife holly. that is
. i do not think that is religion specific. i think it is across the board. his relationship with israel, the muslim world. host: this is a financial times editorial today. general petraeus has been the mastermind behind using drugs to go after al qaeda in the horn of africa. but has been the world reaction to this kind of military strategy? guest: it's a controversial strategy, no question. the administration has doubled down on the use of drones. there are significantly more than a river were then in the bush administration. there is clearly rationale for some of this, but there are some issues about executive privilege in making some of these decisions. i do not think petraeus is the only person who has been a mastermind. there are many who feel strongly about this. i do not see policy changing, but there's certainly a feeling in pakistan, the horn of africa, and other places. in yemen, it was the morning after obama's victory that there was a draw on strike in yemen -- drone strike. you can call them a surgical strikes, but there are certainly casualties. it's a conversat
the world and to present a different notion of america. i don't think that that is religion specific. i think that's across the board , his relationship with israel, his relationship with the muslim world. host: this is a "financial times" editorial today. rethink on drones after petraeus exit. general petraeus has been the master mind behind using deprones to go after al qaeda in the horn of africa, etc. what has been the world reaction to these -- this type of mill tear strategy. guest: the administration has doubled down on thes you of drones. there are hundreds more than there ever were in the bush administration. there's clear security rationale for some of them. there are certainly issues. the administration's execity -- executive privilege in making these decisions. i don't think petraeus was the only person who has been the master mind. this has been -- there are many figures in the administration that feel strongly about this. i don't see the policy changing. but there is certainly a feeling in pakistan, especially, in the horn of africa and other places new york yemen, it was
allowing a situation to deter youruate further and further a religion bore that will create more and more hatred and inability of the country to come together again? i am worried that we are not capable. we seem to be not capable at this moment to use the kind of zip sei -- diplomacy i think would be highly desirable top find buy to bring russia to work out a deal with us to find solution to go forward instead of saying no, no, no, and no again. so i think -- i just want to make the point that paula also made as wonderful as, you know, the modern tools are, the world will not allow us to get away with just tools. we will need to confront these situations, and i think the moment is here where it is overdue, it is extremely urgent to try to find a way that will end the killing in syria not only because it has canings for israel and other countries in indonesia, but because it sits, of course, a terrible negative example to others bad guys in this region and elsewhere who will be encouraged if they can get away with these types of behavior if we don't act. so i think this is a huge challenge
and really not about race or religion, and that is a difficult concept for some others as they look at ours. >> i am with one of the sponsors, northrop grumman. i am curious because i lived in syria. when there is a lot of discussion about things breaking down into sectarianism, i do not see any mention of the fact that syria has probably the largest christian population in the middle east, something like 20% to 30%. ok. my figures are dated. anyway, i am curious why this is not discussed, and if you would comment on the role of the christian community in syria and how you see that playing out -- thank you. >> i mean, i do not think we are hearing a lot right now about the differences between the moslems and christians, because that is not a pressing problem in syria, and getting back to a comment earlier about it spilling over into the rest of the region, -- they are now all in turkey, try to help the turks get assad out. getting him out with goes a long way to add least getting some other resources -- getting him out would go a long way to at least getting some other resources redirected.
discussion of the impact of very strongly developing fundamental movements in the world religions, particularly monotheistic religions, impacting outcomes of democratic elections as well as perhaps creating a certain amount of instability in terms of governance models that we face. i would be very interested in the panel's assessment of the impact of fundamentalist religious movements, particularly in the context of what is going to be a new normal. >> let's get one more in here. >> i think what is so interesting about this discussion is the baseline question, just putting the question of the new normal in the context of america and american power and leadership. how powerful did america look in 1979 up to vietnam? not very. how powerful did america look in 1989, 10 years later? extremely powerful. 1999, in vincible. 2009-now? well, we have settled down, but we do not really know what we have settled down into. i think it is a baseline question, and i think we forget how quickly the perception of the strings -- strength of american leadership can be. what i think is the question a
's religion, that they look into the psychological record, that they looking to his medical records, makes the case for punishing the student or kicking them out. hayden was a little bit upset that he got such a bad dressing down by the president, and so in protest he made a collage. he made a collage that he put on facebook that included asthma puffer, no blood for oil, crushed earth, you know, all the consequences he thought would happen with this parking garage. and he calls it is safe, the environmentalist group that he thought was falling down on the job, zachariah memorial parking garage. the joke being that this president thought this is going to be part of his legacy, his memorial. the university, as i said, zachariah was already looking for an excuse to kk out of school. he slips a note on the university slips a note under hayden's door claiming that this proved, the collage attached to them this proved that hayden was not a clear and present danger to campus. the collage stapled to the note, and if anybody really wants to take us who say they thought the student was a threat, gai
fundamental movements and various world religions, particularly monotheistic religions. impacting outcomes of democratic elections as well as, perhaps, creating certain amount of instability in terms of governance models that we face. i would be very interested in the panel's assessment. the impact of a fundamentalist religious movements in and particularly in the context of what is going to be in a normal. >> let's get one more in here. >> get a my cure. you can just use this. >> i want to check with you. >> speak louder. >> can you hear me? okay. here. >> that would have been too much. so interesting about this discussion, raised by all three participants, if you like the baseline question, and just putting the question of the new normal in the context of america to my american power in, a decade basis, and i was jotting down how powerful america looks in 1979 after vietnam, that are on hostage crisis, not very. how powerful in 1989? just ten years later to major in the powerful. how about 1999? select essentially invisible @booktv vincible. 2009. well, we settle down, but we don't reall
think that people have a right to not practice religion here. they have a right to do things the way they feel comfortable doing it, which is called secular or religious thinking. they have the right in this country not to follow religious law. for him to feel that he needed to resign over a scandal, i do not think that is proper when he does not have to follow religious thinking about sex in this country. host: thank you for the call this morning. here is the editorial from "usa today." host: diane, want to get your thoughts this morning on the democratic line. caller: i went to school with one of my friends in coronado, california. wondering if you are related to anyone from connecticut. host: not sure. what are your thoughts about the general's resignation? caller: let me tell you something, we came here when i was a, we came to a military base. my stepfather served in the first marines. also we went to camp pendleton and he was the commander of that unit for many years. at the veterans day to our veterans. living and deceased. and active, i should say. about the general, were we
a fighter squadron where a previous commander we had i think three or four folks of the mormon religion in the squadron. they didn't drink. they would come to happy hour on fridays at the bar when we used to do that kind of thing. and they'd participate and drink a soda and didn't drink. and he held this against them for some reason. he got fired and i became the leader. not for that but for some other stupid stuff. let me tell you how easy it was to take over that squadron. all you have to do is embrace everybody. and if you don't in a squadron, if you exclude three people not only do they not people part of the team but you're not going to get the job done. our military is not going to get any bigger by the way through most of your careers. we need everybody in a major way. so i think it's also good by the way that you're in the military or going to join the military for those at the service academies and v.m.i. and probably some others in this room. you're joining an organization that has no tolerance for discrimination. and it's been going on for a long time. it's taken a long time
can behe voter who moved into the democratic, but looking at the number of factors, religion, consumer purchases. how did we get them to be a democrat? continuing use of the social media. we still cannot long-term affects of that. one thing that tickels me is -- tickles me is the style of obama. in two weeks somebody knocked and said you are new. the polling place is here, we hope you vote democratic. they knew every new person in the neighborhood. nate silver's predictions, a new ball game in terms of how we predict, how accurate the prediction may be. his work phenomenally so this time >> 50 for 50 on this day call. >> most expensive super pacs, the role of money. are we really going to continue letting that happen? it is amazing. my review of -- my view of record early voting, a nother change from the pastorate in may be very helpful in the state's likely to have bad weather. my take on the house divided statement was i cannot think it is democrat versus republican. i think the republicans have factored the party and they have to figure out who they are the tea party years -- partie
and really not about race or religion. and that is a difficult concept for some others as they look at our society, net and don't necessarily fully understand it. >> i'm a sponsor with northrop-grumman. i am curious because i lived in syria, to go back to syria, when there is a lot of discussion about things breaking down into sectarianism, i don't see any mention of the fact that syria has probably the largest christian population in the middle middle east, something like 20 to 30%. [inaudible] >> my figures are dated. anyway i am curious, if you would comment on the role of the christian community in syria and how you see that playing out? thank you. >> john -- jen'nan. >> we aren't hearing a lot about the difference between the muslims and christians because it's not an overarching and pressing problem in syria and getting back to comment earlier about the rest of the region, my half brother who was with the libyan rebels against gadhafi, they are now all trying to help the turks get assad out so getting back to marc's comment, we have gone a long way to at least getting some of the res
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)